Maybe I’m working him too hard?

Or maybe I just need to buy him a whole case of hats?

Poor Ross!  I’ve been keeping him hopping lately. He did get a day off – well, sort of off. He got to stay home and work on getting the dock in this weekend – does that count? I think he’d probably say no, but hey, we had helpers! And beer! And food! So that counts, right?

And the dock is – mostly – in; just a few floating bits to more into place and secure. He’ll soon be able to start fishing off the end of it. When he gets home. After lots of long days spent driving all over cottage country 🙂

Have been able to do a lot better scheduling than in some previous years, though. Today, for example, he was in Tiny. All over Tiny, but hey – at least all in that one general area. Tomorrow, weather permitting, he’ll be heading up to Gravenhurst area, I hope. And in between times, got lots of Tay Township, Midland & Penetanguishene area calls to get done.

Sure miss his helper though! He needs one to keep track of his hat(s), if nothing else!

Anyway, even though we’re crazy busy right now, I’m always happy to add more to his calendar – give us a call at 705-534-7863, or email me at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com.

A new one on us: ermine!

I did not know that we had ermine in Central Ontario. Guess you learn something every day.

This little guy managed to find it’s way into a house in the Shelburne area  – and stayed for 3 days before getting the food he was after and taking off.

We’ve actually seen quite a few bigger critters around Hogg’s Bay this winter. Coyotes walking along the edges of the lake; almost always two together. A fox that comes right up into our yard to play with our dogs! And marten (or otters, maybe)? Have heard there’s a fisher around as well, although haven’t seen it. Have yet to see an ermine though – but since I guess their coats turn white for the winter, I probably never will. Unless one decides to come visit our house!

 

Busy busy

wpid-milk-carton-with-missing-cell-phoneRoss is having a very busy day today!

We’re off this weekend – going to nephew’s wedding in Alliston for a couple of days, then to our friends’ cottage for one night (yes we live in a cottage in cottage country, but it’s different going to someone else’s 🙂 ) and then back in time for grandson’s birthday party Sunday evening.

So have been trying to get everything possible cleared out of the way before we leave. Lots of calls in and around Midland, Honey Harbour and Tay Township; many new, plus a few follow-ups (damn wasps!). All of which was going according to plan. Until yesterday afternoon, that is, when he got to the right road for an appointment in Port Severn and went to double-check the address on his phone. No phone!!!!

It is most definitely not anywhere in his car, and our attempts to re-trace his travels were completely and utterly unsuccessful. We even toured between here and Kirkfield (yes, we do go over that way on occasion, although it’s not really in our area) looking along the side of the road through a stretch, because according to the google maps timeline, he (or rather, the phone) went up to Kirkfield, then part way back and then it stopped transmitting. The PLACE were it stopped transmitting was nowhere near either of the two places he stopped along the way though, which was very weird. The trail stopped at a corner pretty much out in the middle of nowhere. *sigh*

Anyway, no phone. And several hours (for both of us) lost to hunting for phone. For some unknown reason, it wouldn’t show up in my phone locator thing-a-ma-jig – got to hate it when THAT happens!!!  For about the first half hour after he noticed it missing, I was calling it and it was ringing – but then whoever had it apparently turned it off and it started going right to voicemail. Me, at that point, I was pretty much convinced that the trip back to Kirkfield was not going to be successful, but he wanted to try so try we did.

Which meant that the 3 more jobs he had been going to get done yesterday have now been added to today. And I got to stay up late last night to get my marks finished and submitted and write a cover letter for a job I won’t get (but I’d LOVE to get it and I’d be AWESOME at it).

So now he’s out doing two days work in one (with my phone) and I should get off my butt and go find a big-enough box and wedding gift wrapping paper but I’m tired and clearly am going to need more coffee before that happens!

ANYWAY… how’s that for long, rambling & nothing much to do with solving your pest control problems? But of course, if you’ve stopped by because you do have a pest (other than the sort you married or brought into the world your self), we will be happy to solve it for you.

Just not today, and definitely not this weekend cuz Alex & Michelle are getting married!

We do have a friend staying here this weekend to watch the mutts and give the chinchillas their treats, and he will do his best to take phone messages, but chances are that phone calls likely won’t get returned until Monday, sorry.

However, I will have MY phone and will check and respond to email when I can. No reception at friends’ cottage last time I was there though, so that might be an issue. ANYWAY… I will do my best – and rest assured that by Monday we’ll be back and ready to solve your pest issues.

Have a great weekend!

Lauralee

705-534-7864 || ccpestcontrol@gmail.com

New & somewhat improved quote form

Made a couple of changes to the Quote form for your…well, no, really… my convenience. Added a spot for an explanation of when people choose “Other” and also made providing an email address required.

If by chance it was you that asked for a quote re: an 800 sq ft (water access) cottage recently and never got a reply, that would be why! No email address means I have no way to contact you.  Please do try again!

And thanks for motivating me to finally stop thinking darn, I need to fix that “Other” thing (which I’ve been doing for WAY too long) and getting me to actually get ‘er done.

In other news, we’ve had a very, very busy few days and even though I THINK I have everything sorted out now, I definitely couldn’t swear to it. If you are waiting for something from me, please do feel free to remind me!

You can always reach us by phone at 705-534-7863, or email me at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com .

 

Mouse in the house? Bats in the Belfry? Spiders in the Shower?

In our neck of the woods pests are INEVITABLE especially when you don’t live here all year round.  There are two ways people deal with this problem – WHEN it happens – or BEFORE it happens.

What do WHEN it happens – bees, wasps, shadflies, bed bugs, fleas, spiders, mice, bats or ants – what ever it is, YOU got them!!!  Give Ross a call and we’ll come and solve the problem.

Calling Ross BEFORE it happens, is an alternative solution that has many different upsides.  At Cottage Country Pest control, we use what’s called Integrated Pest Management systems to effectively control and eliminate the pests that are specific to your environment before they become a problem.

We believe that an ounce of prevention is always better than a pound of cure – especially when it comes to your homes, families and pets.  A preventative (non-reactive) approach to caring for your property will you give peace of mind knowing that:

  1.  You won’t have any surprises when arrive for the weekend with guests in tow and
  2.  We’ve used an environmentally friendly approach to dealing with the problems – so you and your family are not exposed to unnecessary chemicals.

How our service works:

  • Inspection – to find out what, where and why
  • Sanitation Recommendations – to eliminate pest food and havens
  • Exclusion – Keep pests out by screening and sealing
  • Cultural Controls – to change what people do that create the pest problems
  • Biological Controls – attack pests where they live with biological measures
  • Judicious use of Pest Control Materials on an as needed basis rather than liberally applying as is done in the case of an emergency
  • Education – if you understand the causes of the problem, you can prevent it from happening.
  • Communication – We make sure you know what’s being done, when it’s being done and why it’s being done.

Whether you are a WHEN it happens or a BEFORE it happens kind of person, know that the problem is INEVITABLE and we can help.  Give us a call 705.534.7863 or send us an email ccpestcontrol@gmail.com.

Mites

Predatory Mite!

Predatory Mite!

Well, it is officially summer! With that comes sunshine, kayaking, fishing, fun … and pests, pests, pests!

If you happen to be a pet-owner, (anything from birds to rats to cats and  dogs), a potential problem you should watch for is … infestation by  mites!

Mites are arachnids (they have FOUR pairs of legs and two main body segments).  Even though they are not always immediately harmful to animals, some of them  (depending on species) also happen to be parasites, requiring a host to feed off  of.

Mites actually vary in appearance, size and appearance based on their particular
species, which also determines which animal/species they prefer as a host.
This is why there exist cat-mites, dog-mites, bird-mites, bat-mites, rat-mites …
you name it; if it is a pet, chances are there is a mite that goes with it.

Their actual life-cycle starts off in egg-form, and they develop through larval
and pupal phases, until they reach full maturity.

Mites are extremely tiny and almost impossible to spot without some kind of
magnification. Sometimes, though, if they scurry across a surface that is plain
and light enough, due to their reddish colour they CAN be spotted.

Mites like to stick with their (animal) “hosts”, and feed off them, but in the
absence of their preferred host, they will bite people.

Interestingly enough, mites tend to live in their animal host’s nest, and come out
periodically specifically to feed, and then go back into hiding in the nest.

Others actually prefer living literally just underneath the skin of their host
animal. It really varies, according to species, host …etc.

Usually, the tell-tale sign of mites is extremely itchy and red papules that form
close together on your skin as a rash. Mites tend to bite in areas where your
clothing would rub on your skin.

The best way to prevent/control mites is to ensure that you deal with infestations by pest that can carry them promptly. If you have issues with birds, mice, or other pests, give us a call at 705.534.7863 or email us at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com, and have Ross come check it out.

Or you can Get a Quote..

HELP! Banquet Happening In My Garage … & I’m Not Invited! Raccoon!

They're only adorable in cartoons!!

They’re only adorable in cartoons!!

Don’t you wish raccoons were the adorable cute and cuddly creatures you see in cartoons like in Disney’s “Pocahontas”? But yeah, nope. There’s a reason they are classified as pests. And this is true even if you live in Victoria Harbour, where nature is abundant.

When you actually get close up to them (not that you ever should), they can actually be quite vicious and bold, surprisingly. Never mind the diseases that they carry.

One of the first signs that you need help because you have a raccoon problem is that you might notice that there is damage to the actual structure of your house (like around the attic). This is caused by the raccoon trying to dig its way into your house. Seriously!

Basically, their main goal is to get to your trash cans, and feast on what you consider to be garbage… anything from leftover food, to eggs, old pet-food…you name it.

And when you walk into your garage the next morning, and find things overturned with garbage strewn everywhere… chances are there was a secret raccoon party the night before (rather than a garbage-specific burglar).      alg-resize-raccoon-jpg

One of the things you can do to make the situation a little better is use garbage cans made of hard plastic and/or metal. You should make sure they have tight-fitting lids, straps or clamps to keep them shut. You should also tie them to a support or in some kind of a rack structure, so that they can’t be tipped over.

Raccoons also tend to like chimneys, which of course ALSO means they can fall right through them and …dum dum DUM… into your house. NOT a likely pleasant experience.

Instead of having to go out and buy all sorts of expensive contraptions to keep them from getting into your chimneys, or having to consider trying to kill them (which really can’t be pleasant, especially if you have kids or grandchildren who could be around), or coming into direct contact with them (they CAN be pretty snarly and vicious), your best bet is to get help from Cottage Country Pest-Control. Just give us a call, and have Ross come around, or call to get a quote!

Cottage Country Pest Control uses humane methods (trapping and relocating), and does all the dirty work for you, so that you can throw your garbage out at night, then go to bed without wondering if there is a banquet happening in your garage!

So, give us a call at 705.534.7863 or email us at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com. Or you can Get a Quote.

– Ammario R.

Pests not covered …

Pets can be pests too - but they're much cuter :)

Pets can be pests too – but they’re much cuter 🙂

Was surprised to read that damage by pests is not typically covered under home insurance in this CBC article 6 big home insurance misconceptions.

Not because I thought they would be – but because I would never have thought that they might be in the first place! Doesn’t seem, to me, as if it even needed saying.

In most cases, if pests have got to the point where they have actually caused that much damage, it is because a relatively small problem was left untreated and allowed to grow to the point where the damage caused far outweighs the amount it would have cost to deal with it.

Of course,  a determined rodent or two can make short work of whatever takes their fancy, as I learned when my new chinchillas got access to a bit of window frame for a very short time (stupid cover fell down; oops! It’s a good thing they are cute).  And we have seen significant amounts of damage caused by a few hungry woodpeckers in search of carpenter ants once or twice. Distressing – but highly unlikely to ever be covered by insurance. I wouldn’t have even thought to ask, actually.

Pretty sure insurance companies expect that we keep the rodents out (or in cages if they happen to be cute!), and deal with carpenter ant problems long before the woodpeckers show up.

It is always cheaper to prevent a problem than to solve one, or to intervene when it’s small rather than waiting until it gets big – and Ross at Cottage Country Pest Control is always happy to help you to save time, money & aggravation. Give us a call at 705-534-7863, or email ccpestcontrol@gmail.com and we will be happy to help.

 

 

 

Mice, mice & more mice

mice-150x150Tis the time of the year for mice, it seems…. well, actually, we get mouse calls years round – but at this time of the year, as the weather starts to get cooler, we do tend to see a major upswing in the number of calls. And of course, Ross is happy to come out and deal with them for you. Not only will he provide you with whatever baits are needed, but he will also do a site survey and help you to sort out what needs to be done to solve the problem so that you won’t need to keep having him back.

Not that we don’t like having to go back to see our customers regularly, of course! But it’s cheaper – and cleaner and less aggravating – to have your pest problems solved properly the first time whenever possible, and that is what we prefer to do.

Give us a call at 705-534-7863, or email us at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com and we’ll be happy to help you get rid of your unwanted ~guests~

Integrated Pest Management

Integrated pest management is something that a lot of pest control companies use in their daily operations, however not everyone is aware of what it is, so I want to explain it a bit so you can get an understanding of it and how it can benefit you.

 

IPM is an effective and environmentally responsible approach to pest management that integrates pesticides and herbicides into the management system and incorporates a combination of common-sense practices. It uses current and comprehensive information on the life cycles of pests and their interactions with the environment.

 

This information, in combination with pest control methods is used to manage pest damage by the most economical means, and with the least possible harm to people, property and the environment.

 

IPM is not a single pest control method, but as series of evaluations, decisions and controls.

 

As stated on Wikipedia, IPM focuses on the following:

 

1. Proper identification of pest – What is it? Cases of mistaken identity may result in ineffective actions. If plant damage due to over-watering are mistaken for fungal infection, spray costs can be incurred, and the plant is no better off.

 

 

2. Learn pest and host life cycle and biology. At the time you see a pest, it may be too late to do much about it except maybe spray with a pesticide[citation needed]. Often, there is another stage of the life cycle that is susceptible to preventative actions. For example, weeds reproducing from last year’s seed can be prevented with mulches. Also, learning what a pest needs to survive allows you to remove these.

 

3. Monitor or sample environment for pest population – How many are here? Preventative actions must be taken at the correct time if they are to be effective. For this reason, once the pest is correctly identified, monitoring must begin before it becomes a problem. For example, in school cafeterias where roaches may be expected to appear, sticky traps are set out before school starts. Traps are checked at regular intervals so populations can be monitored and controlled before they get out of hand. Some factors to consider and monitor include: Is the pest present/absent? What is the distribution – all over or only in certain spots? Is the pest population increasing, decreasing or remaining constant?

 

4. Establish action threshold (economic, health or aesthetic) – How many are too many? In some cases, a certain number of pests can be tolerated. Soybeans are quite tolerant of defoliation, so if there are a few caterpillars in the field and their population is not increasing dramatically, there is not necessarily any action necessary. Conversely, there is a point at which action must be taken to control cost. For the farmer, that point is the one at which the cost of damage by the pest is more than the cost of control. This is an economic threshold. Tolerance of pests varies also by whether or not they are a health hazard (low tolerance) or merely a cosmetic damage (high tolerance in a non-commercial situation).

 

Different sites may also have varying requirements based on specific areas. White clover may be perfectly acceptable on the sides of a tee box on a golf course, but unacceptable in the fairway where it could cause confusion in the field of play.

 

5. Choose an appropriate combination of management tactics For any pest situation, there will be several options to consider. Options include, mechanical or physical control, cultural controls, biological controls and chemical controls. Mechanical or physical controls include picking pests off plants, or using netting or other material to exclude pests such as birds from grapes or rodents from structures. Cultural controls include keeping an area free of conducive conditions by removing or storing waste properly, removing diseased areas of plants properly. Biological controls can be support either through conservation of natural predators or augmentation of natural predators.

 

It’s important to know that not all pest control companies that claim to follow IPM actually do. Cottage Country Pest Control is environmentally responsible, and we do follow IPM. Always.

 

We firmly believe that IPM is the way to go and that when done properly it can be the most effective approach to getting rid of pests in your home. If you have any questions or you want to book an appointment please call 705-534-7863 or email us today.