Shrews

2015-01-30 14.59.50Shrews look like rodents but are actually not – and fortunately, since they can be vicious little pests and have been known to attack household pets, they don’t usually find their way into homes, at least not here in cottage country.

Never say never though – Ross was out dealing with his first ever shrew call today, right here in Victoria Harbour. And he brought home the evidence for me, wasn’t that nice of him?

If you have any sort of pest problems, give us a call at 705-534-7863 or email ccpestcontrol@gmail.com and Ross will be happy to solve it for you.

Mice, mice & more mice

mice-150x150Tis the time of the year for mice, it seems…. well, actually, we get mouse calls years round – but at this time of the year, as the weather starts to get cooler, we do tend to see a major upswing in the number of calls. And of course, Ross is happy to come out and deal with them for you. Not only will he provide you with whatever baits are needed, but he will also do a site survey and help you to sort out what needs to be done to solve the problem so that you won’t need to keep having him back.

Not that we don’t like having to go back to see our customers regularly, of course! But it’s cheaper – and cleaner and less aggravating – to have your pest problems solved properly the first time whenever possible, and that is what we prefer to do.

Give us a call at 705-534-7863, or email us at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com and we’ll be happy to help you get rid of your unwanted ~guests~

Raccoons

Yes, we do deal with raccoons (although it’s not Ross’ favourite kind of call) …. they can be a royal pain in the posterior.

I have, today, been watching episodes on The Nature of Things website and happened to notice this episode called Raccoon Nation. Lots of interesting information if you’re interested.

But of course, if you have a raccoon problem – or any other pest control challenges – do give us a call at 705-534-7863 or email ccpestcontrol@gmail.com and Ross will be happy to solve it for you.

Mouse Call!

With the temperatures starting to dip as we approach the colder months, mice are searching for a warm and safe place to spend the winter and continue to raise their young. Houses, cabins, and storage sheds all offer protection from the elements for these tiny creatures, and most offer a steady supply of food.

The house mouse (mus musculus) is a small rodent with beady small eyes, relatively large ears, and weighs in at less than an ounce. They are typically dusty gray or brown in colour, with lighter underbellies. With its keen senses and inquisitive nature, the mouse is very adaptable to indoor living and will take advantage of this living arrangement whenever the opportunity presents itself.

Mice are reportedly able to squeeze through openings as small as 1/4 inch and thus any unsealed openings, such as from utility lines or pipes, make the shelter easily accessible. Once inside, mice are able to procreate quickly and under ideal living conditions, a single mated pair can produce 100 direct offspring within their lifespan. Each offspring reaches sexual maturity at 5-6 weeks of age which can result in a large population within a very short period of time.

Damages and risk factors from a mouse infestation include:

Food Losses Food loss occurs not only from actual consumption by the mouse population, but also contamination from feces and urine resulting in pantry items and feed, such as grain and pet food, needing to be discarded.

Structural Damage Mice gnaw and chew on a wide variety of items for numerous reasons. They often make nesting material from insulation or upholstery furniture. They may also chew through electrical wires, resulting in not only costly repairs, but also fire hazards.

Noise and Odour Despite their small size, mice can be quite noise intrusive, especially at night when they are most active. It is not uncommon to hear mouse activity in the walls and bare floors as they navigate their way throughout the house. Urine and natural oil build-ups along common travel paths can result in a persistant, musky odour.

Health Issues Mice can carry life threatening viruses such as Hantavirus and Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis. Seemingly healthy rodents may not show any symptoms, but humans can become ill from direct contact with mouse droppings or fluid secretions from infected animals. Hantavirus can also be contracted by inhaling ‘nest dust’ – airborne particles from decaying fecal matter. Salmonella bacteria can be spread on food prep surfaces if the mouse tracks fecal matter with it’s paws.

Don’t invite mice into your home this season… Call Cottage Country Pest Control at 705-534-7863, or email us, to book your fall pest control maintenance service.

Mice, rats, raccoons, bats? Fall Special

As we move towards winter it is a great time to think about ensuring that your home or cottage is safe, secure, and free of pests. Bats are heading off to their winter habitats, so now is the time to clean up after them, and ensure that they can’t return.

mice-150x150And mice and other rodents will soon be looking for winter homes. You do NOT want to be their winter host, as they can do an alarming amount of damage in a very short time. Squirrels are especially problematic: in addition to spoiling food and leaving droppings wherever they happen to be, they are prone to chewing wiring & other objects as well.

Call Cottage Country Pest Control at 705-534-7863, or email us, to book your fall pest control maintenance service. Services include:

  • thorough inspection
  • rodent-proofing & exclusion
  • bat removal, clean up & exclusion
  • bait stations & product

Winter cottage maintenance services also available.

Just Cuz

oh-hi-raccon-284x300.I thought it was cute

But we do know that racoons can be a really big pain in the bum, and yes, we do relocate them when necessary.  If you have racoons you’d rather not, give Cottage Country Pest Control a call at 705-534-7863 or email us at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com.

Moles

This will be the first of 2 blogs about Moles and Voles. The posts will explain what they are,   why they are considered pests and how to manage them.

Moles are insectivores, which means they generally don’t eat plants, but instead they eat earthworms, insects, grubs, slugs and in some cases even small snakes or mice.

Adult moles generally measure between 12-20 cm in length. They can range in colour from dark grey to brown and they have small eyes but big front paws with strong claws that they use for digging and tunneling in soil.

Moles don’t hibernate and they can be active day or night year-round. However, the majority of their surface activity will happen now during the Spring or in the Fall. They are also solitary animals and will only have one litter a year of 3-4 young.

Their young will stay with their mother in her tunnels for about 4 weeks. At about 4 weeks the young will start making their own tunnels and they will reach adult size in 4-8 weeks.

It’s been noted that they don’t eat plants, however they can still cause tons of damage to plants and roots because of their digging and tunneling. They can destroy lawns or gardens with their tunnels by removing dirt from around the roots, which can cause the plants to dry out and die.

Moles can be considered beneficial because of what they eat, however because of their tunneling and digging they are also considered pests.

If you suspect that you have moles, voles or any other sort of pest problem, Cottage Country Pest Control is happy to help – give us a call at (705)534-7863 or email us at ccpestcontrol@gmail.com .